AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 25, Number 3, 2016

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Study Reveals Weight Loss Drug's Effect on the Brain

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Results suggest drug could particularly benefit "emotional eaters"A weight-loss drug dampened the response to food cues in regions of the brain associated with attention and emotion, leading to decreases in caloric intake, weight and body …

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New Epilepsy Drugs Work by Jamming Brain Receptor

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Details from study in rat brain cells could lead to more effective antiepileptic drugs with fewer side effectsColumbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have discovered how a new epilepsy drug works, which may lead the …

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A New Angle on Anxiety

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Clinical anxiety affects up to 30 percent of Americans who are in great need of better treatments with fewer side effects. A study from Boston Children's Hospital finds that certain neurons in the hypothalamus play …

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How Sleep Deprivation Harms Memory

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Researchers from the Universities of Groningen (Netherlands) and Pennsylvania have discovered a piece in the puzzle of how sleep deprivation negatively affects memory. For the first time, a study in mice shows that five hours …

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Exercise can Tackle Symptoms of Schizophrenia

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Aerobic exercise can significantly help people coping with the long-term mental health condition schizophrenia, according to a new study from University of Manchester researchers. Through combining data from 10 independent clinical trials with a total …

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Treatment Option for Alzheimer's Disease Possible

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A research project has shown that an experimental model of Alzheimer's disease can be successfully treated with a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. A team led by David Brough, MD, from the University of Manchester found …

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Seasonal Allergies Could Change Your Brain

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Hay fever may do more than give you a stuffy nose and itchy eyes, seasonal allergies may change the brain. Scientists found that brains of mice exposed to allergen actually produced more neurons than controls, …

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New Cause of Immune Neuropathy Discovered

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Patients suffering from so-called immune-mediated neuropathies frequently have a long medical record. As there are no diagnostic tests available to reliably diagnose the disease, the diagnosis is frequently made belatedly and patients can be misdiagnosed. …

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Motivation to Bully is Regulated by Brain Reward Circuits

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Researchers identify nerve cell communication between specific brain regions, providing insight for the development of new therapeutic strategiesResearchers used a mouse model to identify the mechanisms by which specific brain reward regions interact to modulate …

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Unlocking the Secrets of Nerve Regeneration

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Hokkaido University researchers investigated what makes a specific nerve cell in the brain regenerate when others do notNerves that are damaged with the central nervous system of adult mammals do not regenerate. However, granule cells …

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New Clues About the Aging Brain's Memory Functions

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In this study, researchers found that the dopamine D2 receptor is linked to long-term, episodic memory. The function of this receptor often reduces with age and the onset of dementia in certain patients. It was …

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Shedding Light on Migraine Headache Relief

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Texas A&M College of Dentistry researcher uses revolutionary technique to reduce orofacial painWith patients who suffer from migraine, many find little relief with medications and are forced to suffer through the pain and sensitivity to …

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Natural Molecule Could Improve Parkinson's

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A natural molecule shows benefit in preliminary clinical trial for Parkinson's DiseaseAccording to many, the lack of dopamine in the brain is thought to be the cause of Parkinson's disease. Current treatments for Parkinson's include …

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Regenerating Memory with Neural Stem Cells

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Researchers look for better ways to reduce memory loss in people with age-related disorders Although the human brain can be malleable in certain ways, it is still subjected to the threat of age-related illnesses, such as …

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Is Beer Good for the Brain?

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Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol can have negative effects on the brain. However, drinking light or moderate amounts may not have such a negative effect. There has been a lot of disagreement on the role …

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Mapping Neural Networks to Strengthen Circadian Rhythms

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Researchers in China have analyzed the network heterogeneity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus to ultimately reverse age-related decline in circadian rhythmMost people have experienced some sort of grogginess the morning after traversing time zones. This is …

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Social Objects in the Brain

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The study suggests that we experience symbolic objects as social entitiesIn a patient's mind, objects can simply, just be objects. However, in certain situations, objects can be symbolic objects that have a specific social meaning …

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Migraine Drugs Underused

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New research shows that more migraines could be safely treated with drugs that are known to constrict blood vesselsWith only 500 headache specialists in the U.S. to over 38 million sufferers, it is clear more …

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Clinical Study Suggests the Origin of Glioblastoma Subtypes

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Implications for personalized medicine and molecularly targeted therapies"It is now well-documented that cancers that look the same under the microscope actually contain different genetic changes, or mutations, and respond differently to therapy," said Clark Chen, …

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A New Player Revealed in Nerve Growth Process

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Role of adapter protein CD2AP in neuron sprouting discovered by University of Louisville researchers could lead to therapies for Alzheimer's disease, stroke recovery and spinal cord injury A protein that has been known for its function …

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Too Much 'Noise' can Affect Brain Development

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UCI study may help to better understand developmental disordersIn an effort to improve improve our understanding of developmental disorders, scientists at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), have determined that uncontrolled fluctuations, known as 'noise' …

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Small Nerve Fibers Defy Neuropathy Conventions

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Study suggests even prediabetes may cause nerve damageConventional wisdom and knowledge indicates that nerve damage occurs at the longest ends first in patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes. However, a recent study has shown …

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Social Objects in the Brain

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The study suggests that we experience symbolic objects as social entitiesObjects can just be objects or can have some sort of social meaning assigned to them. In this study, scientists found that patients can experience …

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Birth Control May Increase Risk of Seizures

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Women with a history of epilepsy who are taking oral birth control pills may be at increased risk for more frequent seizures. "We were inspired by an earlier study which surveyed women with epilepsy and …

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Mild TBI Linked to Eye Movement Impairment

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According to researchers at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USU), mild traumatic brain injuries (TBI) could potentially be linked to eye movement impairment. This discovery can lead to potentially more effective ways of …

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A Way Toward Unlocking the Teenage Brain?

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The teenage brain is full of mystery. How does one commemorate a friend's face with either eyes and commit it to memory? How does that work? UO scientists are on their way to understanding how …

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Aging and Alzheimer's: Turning Back the Clock

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Cell's protein factory may hold key to stalling cognitive declineIt has been predicted that more than 100 million people will be affected by Alzheimer's disease by the year 2050 unless new treatments are discovered. Currently, …

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Long-Term Stress Erodes Memory

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This is the first study of its kind to link short-term memory and prolonged stress, such as that sustained by bullying victims, soldiers and those with demanding boss. Continued stress can erode memory, and the …

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Blueprint of Body’s Heat Sensor Discovered

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In a study published in the journal Nature Structural Biology and Molecular Biology, researchers describe the structure of a protein linked to pain and heat reception in the brain. An ion channel in the cell …

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Why Women’s Stroke Risk Changes Post Menopause

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According to a study published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism, women's stroke risk may come down to a compound the body produces from estrogen, known as 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME). The findings from …

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Potential New Therapeutic Target for ALS

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A research team led by researchers from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center recently discovered a protein called Pur-alpha that is a component of stress granules in cells and may protect against the toxic degeneration …

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Aerobic Exercise Benefits Parkinson’s Patients

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Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease, according to a report recently published in the journal JAMA Neurology. Aerobic exercise liberates trophic factors, which are small proteins in the brain that behave …

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Depression Risk Linked to Neuroplasticity

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Building on a 30-year, three-generation study of depressed individuals, their children and offspring, a study published in the journal Psychiatry Research provided a better understanding of the familial risk for depression and the role neuroplasticity …

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Window of Stroke Recovery Can Re-Open in Mice

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Using mice whose front paws were still partly disabled after an initial induced stroke, researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine reported that by inducing a second stroke nearby in their brains, researchers were …

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How Much Does Race Play a Role in Stroke Risk?

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Although African-Americans are at three-times greater risk of a first stroke than their white counterparts, they may not be at a higher risk for a second stroke, according to a study published in the journal …

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Poverty Linked to Brain Connectivity Changes, Depression

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By analyzing the brain connectivity of 105 children, ages seven to 10, researchers from Washington University St. Louis found that key structures in the brain were connected differently in underprivileged children compared to kids who were being raised …

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Wireless, Dissolvable Brain Sensors Developed

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Brain sensors that can monitor intracranial pressure/temperature, and can then be absorbed by the body were recently developed by scientists from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and engineers from the University of Illinois …

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How do Glioblastoma Cells Survive and Invade?

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The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has identified a protein called SGEF that promotes the survival of glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cells and helps the cancer invade brain tissue. Researchers identified SGEF as a target for …

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Cell Taxonomy Identified in Mouse Visual Cortex

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In order to completely understand brain function, researchers need to understand the cellular building blocks of the brain, including the diversity of cell types. In a study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, researchers from …

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In Vitro Model of Cockayne Syndrome Created

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The first, stem-cell derived in vitro cellular model of Cockayne syndrome (CS) was recently created by researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego. The findings, published …

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High Urate Levels, Lower Parkinson's Disease Risk

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Men who have high levels of urate (also known as uric acid) in their blood may be less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, according to a study recently published in the journal Neurology. Previous studies …

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Odor Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease

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In a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other collaborating institutions, researchers reported a uniquely identifiable odor signature from mouse-model studies of Alzheimer’s disease. According to researchers, the odor signature appears in …

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New EEG System Can be Used for Real-life Applications

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Bioengineers and cognitive scientists recently developed the first portable, 64-channel wearable brain activity monitoring system that’s comparable to state-of-the-art equipment found in research laboratories. The system is a better fit for real-world applications because it …

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Trauma Team Members Face Risk of Compassion Fatigue

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Research published in the Journal of Trauma Nursing found that trauma team members are at risk of compassion fatigue and burnout syndrome. The authors of the research identified stress triggers and made recommendations to help …

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Study Offers Potential New ALS Treatments

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In a study recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine announced their evidence-based description of the neuronal protein clumps thought …

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Hypnosis May Provide New Option for Awake Craniotomy

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A new "hypnosedation" technique discussed in a study published in the journal Neurosurgery explores hypnosis as a way to reduce the psychological trauma associated with awake craniotomy procedures. During the study, researchers evaluated their hypnosis …

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3D Footage Links Neurons with Motion and Behavior

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Researchers from Princeton University reported a technique in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that allowed them to record 3D footage of neural activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a worm species …

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Study Sheds Light on Evolution of the Brain

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In a paper published in the journal Nature, written by researchers from Princeton University and Bell Labs, a study conducted on the evolution of the brain revealed how the brains of humans and other mammals are …

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Vitamin D Supplements May Benefit MS Sufferers

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According to a pilot study conducted by Johns Hopkins physicians, taking a high dose of vitamin D3 is safe for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and may help regulate the body’s hyperactive immune response. Although …

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Smart Fat Cells Cross the Blood-brain Barrier

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An MRI contrast agent that can pass through the blood-brain barrier will allow doctors to detect deadly gliomas earlier, according to researchers from Penn State College of Medicine. Contrast agents used to outline gliomas on …

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The Brain’s GPS Depends on Visual Landmarks

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In a recent study published in the journal Cell, researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, found that space-mapping neurons have a strong dependence on what is being looked at when triangulating location — …

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How Music and Language Shape the Brain

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A Northwestern University professor recently delivered a lecture regarding a new biological approach to measure an individual’s sound processing ability. "Making sense of sound is one of the most computationally complex tasks we ask our brains …

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Brain Cell Death is Possible MS Trigger

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According to research published by researchers from the University of Chicago and Northwestern Medicine, multiple sclerosis (MS) may be triggered by the death of brain cells that make myelin. The death of these cells initiates …

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Little or No “July Effect” in Neurosurgery

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The “July effect” is the theory that more medical and surgical errors, and, consequently, greater levels of morbidity and mortality occur during July, the month during which fourth year medical students become interns and residents …

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How is a Developing Brain Assembled?

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A new, open-source software, described by researchers from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and the Center for Information Technology may help track the embryonic development and movement of neuronal cells throughout the …

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Researchers Find Internal Grammar in the Brain

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Research published in a recent issue of Nature Neuroscience supports Noam Chomsky’s theory from 1957 that humans have an internal grammar mechanism that underlies our processing of language and allows us to make sense of …

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Study Reveals Brain Circuits that Shape Sensory Perceptions

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In a study recently published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, researchers from John Hopkins University School of Medicine identified brain processes in mice that may help explain why humans experience ambiguous sensory inputs. “In everyday …

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Playing 3D Video Games May Boost Memory Formation

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According to neurobiologists from the University of California, Irvine, playing three-dimensional video games can boost the formation of memories and improve hand-eye coordination and reaction times. For their research, researchers recruited non-gamer college students to …

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Controlled Exercise May Help Kids Post-Concussion

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In a recent study published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 54 youths from age 8-18 completed an exertion bicycle test during their recovery after concussive brain injury. The researchers found …

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Exploring New Paths for MS Treatment

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is trailblazing a potential new pathway for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The research, published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation, examines a novel …

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Physicians and Burnout: It's Getting Worse

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Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained …

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Why Online Doctor Ratings are Good Medicine

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A growing number of health consumers are consulting online physician-rating sites when choosing doctors even if the value of those sites - whether they're reliable sources for information, or capable of driving improvements in health …

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Brain Scans May Help Predict Recovery From Coma

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Brain scans of people in a coma may help predict who will regain consciousness, according to a study published in the journal Neurology. During the study, 27 people in a coma with severe brain injuries …

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New Metabolic PET Tracer Developed

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine recently devised a new way to allow for brain tumor tissue to stand out more during PET scans. In order to do so, researchers capitalized on the …

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Three-Minute Test Effectively Diagnoses Lewy Body Dementia

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Although Lewy Body disease (LBD) is the second-most-common degenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease, it is poorly recognized. However, a neuroscientist from Florida Atlantic University recently developed the “Lewy Body Composite Risk Score” (LBCRS) to quickly …

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Eye Drops Deliver Gene Therapy for Brain Disorders

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A research team recently developed a simplified approach for delivering and monitoring gene therapy for brain disorders. The group, from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), used eye drops to deliver the …

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TBI Triggers Liver to Produce Inflammatory Protein

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

A new animal study shows that hypertension drugs can block the production of proteins related to inflammation after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study, published in The American Journal of Pathology, revealed that in …

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Can Work Stress be Linked to Stroke?

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

According to a meta-analysis published in the journal Neurology, having a high-stress job may be linked to a higher risk of stroke. The analysis looked at all of the available research on job strain and …

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Researchers Show How DNA Repair Proteins

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies recently discovered critical details regarding how DNA repair proteins. The study, according to researchers, reveals fundamental mechanisms that distinguish DNA breaks at cellular and viral genomes to …

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Scientists See Motor Neurons 'Walking' in Real Time

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

New technology developed by scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies shows how spinal cord cells make connections with motor neurons, providing more insight into spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases, such as amytrophic …

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Scientists Use Sound Waves to Control Brain Cells

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A new way to selectively activate brain, heart, muscle and other cells using ultrasonic waves has been developed by scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The technique, published in the journal Nature Communications, …

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Researchers Learn How to Grow Old Brain Cells

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Scientists from Salk Institute for Biological Studies recently developed a new technique to grow aged brain cells from human skin. During the study, fibroblasts (cells in connective tissue) from elderly participant donors were directly converted into …

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Childhood Brain Tumors Affect Working Memory

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors have lower working memory performance compared with healthy adults, according to research published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. The findings specifically showed that adult survivors of …

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Critical Care Nurses Can Promote Palliative Care

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

According to an article recently published in the journal Critical Care Nurse, barriers to palliative care consultations prevent many patients and their families from discussing it with their team of health-care providers. The article, “Overcoming …

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3D-Printed Guide Helps Regrow Complex Nerves After Injury

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

A team of researchers recently developed a 3D-printed guide that helps regrow both the sensory and motor functions of complex nerves after injury. The research, published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, describes a combination …

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Head Impacts and Collegiate Football Practice and Games

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

In a study recently published in the Journal of Neurosurgery, researchers from the University of Virginia (UVa) examined the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained by college football players over an entire season …

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Resveratrol Impacts Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarker

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

In a study recently published in the journal Neurology, researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center found that a particular biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease stabilized when participants took a purified form of resveratrol, a naturally occurring …

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Expert Panel Advises Brain Health Screening

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

A panel of world experts on aging who recently convened at Saint Louis University recommended that everyone, age 70 and older, have their memory and reasoning ability evaluated annually by a doctor or health care provider. …

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A New Biomarker for Migraine?

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

According to a recent study published in the journal Neurology, researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine may have discovered a new biomarker in the blood for episodic migraine. During the study, 52 …

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Unexplored Therapeutic Targets for ALS

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

A new study presented at the 14th International Conference on Endothelin: Physiology, Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, researchers from Johns Hopkins University identified an unexplored avenue of treatment for ALS. Endothelin (ET)-1, a small protein produced by …

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Levels of Dementia May be Stabilizing in Europe

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

The number of people worldwide living with dementia is estimated to increase from 47.5 million to 75.6 million by 2030. However, researchers from the University of Cambridge recently collected data from five large epidemiological studies …

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Exoskeleton Helps Paralyzed Man Take Voluntary Steps

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

Scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles recently reported how a man paralyzed from the waist down has been able to move his legs voluntarily, with the help of a robotic exoskeleton. The “step-like” …

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Study Shows Potential for New Glioblastoma Treatment

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

A completely new treatment for glioblastoma, which combines a common chemotherapy agent with T cells, may enter clinical trials following highly successful mouse-model studies. Researchers with the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of …

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Parkinson’s Disease Brain Cells at Risk of Burnout

AANS Neurosurgeon | Newsline

According to a study recently published in the journal Current Biology, the death of brain cells in Parkinson’s disease may caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities …

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Calendar/Courses

Neurosurgery Dissection Course
Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, 2016; Coventry, United Kingdom

Neurosurgery Update Course
Oct. 3-10, 2016; Coventry, United Kingdom

EUROSPINE 2016
Oct. 5-7, 2016; Berlin, Germany