AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 1, 2017

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Abnormal Brain Protein May Contribute to Alzheimer's Disease Development

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Rush researcher reports findings of role of TDP-43 in brain

A recently-recognized pathologic protein in the brain may play a larger role in the development of clinical Alzheimer’s disease dementia than previously recognized, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center.

“This finding could help researchers to understand the cause of memory loss and lead to new ways to approach studying Alzheimer’s disease,” said Bryan James, PhD, study author and epidemiologist with the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center. “Our study found that when the main characteristic pathologies of Alzheimer’s disease, plaques and tangles, were mixed with a pathologic protein called TDP-43 in the brain, the combination was more likely to result in a diagnosed Alzheimer’s dementia than plaques and tangles alone.”

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Calendar/Courses

Microsurgery Course Zurich
March 29-April 1, 2017; Zurich, Switzerland

12th World Congress on Brain Injury
March 29-April 1, 2017; New Orleans

2017 National Neuroscience Review
March 31-April 1, 2017; National Harbor, Md.

Brain & Brain PET 2017
April 1-4, 2017; Berlin, Germany

Neurosurgical Society of America Annual Meeting 2017
April 2-5, 2017; Jacksonville, Fla.

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