You are viewing AANS Neurosurgeon Volume 25, Number 3, 2016. View our current issue, Volume 26, Number 1, 2017

AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 25, Number 3, 2016

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Study: Wireless Stimulation May Ease Migraine Pain as Well as Drugs

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A preliminary study suggests that a new, wireless patch that you wear on your arm may help reduce migraine pain as well as drugs. “These results need to be confirmed with additional studies, but they are exciting,” said study author David Yarnitsky, MD, of Technion Faculty of Medicine in Haifa, Israel, and a member of the Medical Advisory Board for Theranica, maker of the stimulation device. “People with migraine are looking for non-drug treatments, and this new device is easy to use, has no side effects and can be conveniently used in work or social settings.” The device uses electrical stimulation to block the pain signals from reaching the brain. The patch uses rubber electrodes and a chip on an armband. The device can be controlled by a smartphone app. In the past when stimulation has been tested for people with migraine, devices needed wires and were attached to the head.

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