AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 27, Number 1, 2018

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Novel Regulation of Gene Expression in Brain Tumors Identified

Study reveals how combination of two key enzymes promotes tumor cell formation and growth

Study results revealed previously unknown interplay between two key enzymes and a novel understanding of how brain cancer tumors form and spread, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The study, led by Zhimin Lu, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Neuro-Oncology, identified a previously unreported linkage between two enzymes known as Gcn5 and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), providing important new information about a histone modification process called succinylation. 

Histones are proteins vital for gene regulation, and histone modifications are central to regulation of many chromosome-related processes, including DNA replication, transcription and repair. There are 16 known histone modifications, including succinylation. Lu’s team studied the alpha-KGDH-generated succinyl-coenzyme A, a molecule crucial for many biochemical reactions in protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as for providing energy to cells.

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Calendar/Courses

Second International Brain Mapping Course
April 26-27, 2018; New Orleans

Surgical Approaches to Skull Base
April 26-28, 2018; St. Louis, MO

2018 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting
April 28-May 2, 2018; New Orleans

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