You are viewing AANS Neurosurgeon Volume 26, Number 2, 2017. View our current issue, Volume 26, Number 3, 2017

AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 2, 2017

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It’s Not a Rat’s Race for Human Stem Cells Grafted to Repair Spinal Cord Injuries

Lengthy study finds that implanted neural stem cells grow slow and steady, and success needs to be measured accordingly

 

More than one-and-a-half years after implantation, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center report that human neural stem cells (NSCs) grafted into spinal cord injuries in laboratory rats displayed continued growth and maturity, with functional recovery beginning one year after grafting.

“The NSCs retained an intrinsic human rate of maturation despite being placed in a traumatic rodent environment,” said Paul Lu, PhD, associate professor of neurosciences and lead author of the study. “That’s a finding of great importance in planning for human clinical trials.”

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