AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 3, 2017

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Mount Sinai Researchers First to Measure the Brain's Electric Activity to Pinpoint When Cocaine-addicted Individuals are Most Vulnerable to Relapse

New research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai using electroencephalography, or EEG, indicates that adults addicted to cocaine may be increasingly vulnerable to relapse from day two to one month of abstinence and most vulnerable between one and six months. The findings suggest that the most intense periods of craving for illicit substances often coincide with patients’ release from addiction treatment programs and facilities. It is not known why individuals with substance use disorders relapse even after remaining abstinent from illicit substances for long periods of time. However, it is clear that cue-induced craving – craving elicited by the exposure to cues previously associated with drug use – plays a major role in relapse. To read more, click here.

Calendar/Courses

8th World Congress of Neuroendoscopy
Nov. 1-4, 2017; Cape Town, South Africa

3rd Annual Selected Topics in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery
Nov. 4, 2017 - Nov. 5, 2017; Boston, Mass.

Interactive Calendar

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