AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 4, 2017

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IU Researchers Identify Promising Treatment Option for People Suffering From Aggression After Traumatic Brain Injury

A drug originally developed in the 1960s as an antiviral medication is showing promise as a treatment option for people who suffer from increased feelings of aggression following traumatic brain injury, Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have reported.

Aggression and anger are among the most common emotional and behavioral symptoms experienced by traumatic brain injury patients—often resulting in poorer rehabilitation outcomes and negatively affecting patients’ relationships with family and friends and their ability to live at home and maintain steady employment.

The team of researchers, led by Flora Hammond, MD, chair of the IU School of Medicine Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Covalt Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, found that in multiple studies of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury and moderate-severe aggression, taking 100 miligrams of the drug Amantadine twice daily appeared to be beneficial in decreasing aggression, from the perspective of the patients.

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