AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 4, 2017

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Early Alzheimer's Diagnosis May be Possible With New Imaging Compound

New tool detects Alzheimer’s protein, may help identify brain changes, assess treatment effects

By the time unambiguous signs of memory loss and cognitive decline appear in people with Alzheimer’s disease, their brains are already significantly damaged, dotted with clumps of destructive protein known as amyloid beta. For years, scientists have sought methods and clues to help identify brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s earlier in the disease process, so they can try to stop or even reverse the changes before they severely affect people’s lives. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a chemical compound, named Fluselenamyl, that detects amyloid clumps better than current FDA-approved compounds. If a radioactive atom in incorporated into the compound, its location in a living brain can be monitored using positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Click here to read more.

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