You are viewing AANS Neurosurgeon Volume 25, Number 4, 2016. View our current issue, Volume 26, Number 1, 2017

AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 25, Number 4, 2016

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How Can We Predict Whose MS Will Worsen?

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In older people with multiple sclerosis (MS), having fatigue and limited leg function is more often seen in people with MS progression than in those without, according to a preliminary study. “Study participants with those symptoms were more likely to progress from relapsing-remitting MS to secondary progressive MS within five years,” said study author Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo in Buffalo, N.Y., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). “Better understanding who is at high risk of getting worse may eventually allow us to tailor more specific treatments to these people.” Approximately 80-85 percent of people with MS are initially diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS, which is marked by symptom flare-ups followed by periods of remission. Most people eventually transition to secondary progressive MS, which does not have wide swings in symptoms but instead a slow, steady, worsening of the disease.

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Calendar/Courses

Microsurgery Course Zurich
March 29-April 1, 2017; Zurich, Switzerland

12th World Congress on Brain Injury
March 29-April 1, 2017; New Orleans

2017 National Neuroscience Review
March 31-April 1, 2017; National Harbor, Md.

Brain & Brain PET 2017
April 1-4, 2017; Berlin, Germany

Neurosurgical Society of America Annual Meeting 2017
April 2-5, 2017; Jacksonville, Fla.

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