AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 27, Number 3, 2018

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Caffeine Level in Blood May Help Diagnose People with Parkinson’s Disease

Testing the level of caffeine in the blood may provide a simple way to aid the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

The study found that people with Parkinson’s disease had significantly lower levels of caffeine in their blood than people without the disease, even if they consumed the same amount of caffeine.

“Previous studies have shown a link between caffeine and a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but we haven’t known much about how caffeine metabolizes within the people with the disease,” said study author Shinji Saiki, MD, PhD, of Juntendo University School of Medicine in Tokyo, Japan.

People in the study with more severe stages of the disease did not have lower levels of caffeine in the blood, suggesting that the decrease occurs from the earliest stages of the disease, according to David G. Munoz, MD, of the University of Toronto in Canada, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

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2019 Mayo Clinic Advancements in Surgical & Medical Management of the Spine
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