AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 3, 2017

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Some Brains are Blind to Moving Objects

As many as half of people are blind to motion in some part of their field of vision, but the deficit doesn’t have anything to do with the eyes.

In a study published Sept. 28 in the journal Psychological Science, University of Wisconsin–Madison psychology Professor Bas Rokers and collaborators in the Netherlands have shown that motion blindness is a failure of the brain to properly interpret sensory information — a type of deficit called agnosia.

The best-known example of an agnosia is probably face blindness, called prosopagnosia, in which people can’t tell one face from another (and thus can’t tell people apart without other clues).

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Calendar/Courses

8th World Congress of Neuroendoscopy
Nov. 1-4, 2017; Cape Town, South Africa

3rd Annual Selected Topics in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery
Nov. 4, 2017 - Nov. 5, 2017; Boston, Mass.

Interactive Calendar

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