AANS Neurosurgeon | Volume 26, Number 3, 2017

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Alzheimer's Drug Prescribed 'Off-label' for Mild Cognitive Impairment Could Pose Risk for Some

Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer’s disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. UCLA School of Nursing researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation — the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K — donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline. Mild cognitive impairment is a transitional state between normal age-related changes in cognition and dementia. Because many people with the condition display symptoms similar to those caused by Alzheimer’s disease, some physicians prescribe donepezil, which is marketed under the brand name. Aricept and is the most-prescribed medication for Alzheimer’s. Donepezil was tested as a possible treatment for mild cognitive impairment in a large, federally funded study published in 2005, but it was not approved by the FDA. Still, doctors have often prescribed the drug “off-label” — meaning that it is not approved for that specific disorder — for their patients with mild cognitive impairment.

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Calendar/Courses

8th World Congress of Neuroendoscopy
Nov. 1-4, 2017; Cape Town, South Africa

3rd Annual Selected Topics in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery
Nov. 4, 2017 - Nov. 5, 2017; Boston, Mass.

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